Expensive Car Drivers are Less Likely to Yield to Pedestrians
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Expensive Cars are Less Likely to Yield to Pedestrians

A study recently published in the Journal of Transport & Health found that people who drive expensive vehicles are less likely to stop and yield to pedestrians, even when they are in crosswalks.

Noticing the disturbing uptick in pedestrian accidents over the past decade, researchers decided to investigate what demographic factors appeared to contribute to these types of accidents. In South Carolina, one pedestrian is killed in a traffic collision every two days, according to the S.C. Department of Highway Safety.

The study also found that drivers were more likely to yield to women than men and whites compared to minorities.

Have you been hurt in a pedestrian accident in South Carolina? You may be entitled to compensation to help with your medical costs and other losses if someone else is responsible for the accident. Call or contact an experienced pedestrian accident attorney at Stewart Law Offices today.

South Carolina Pedestrian Laws

Many of us have heard the expression that “pedestrians always have the right of way.” But is this true? The fact is that both pedestrians and motorists have certain rights and responsibilities in South Carolina.

The law says that “Notwithstanding other provisions of any local ordinance, every driver of a vehicle shall exercise due care to avoid colliding with any pedestrian or any person propelling a human-powered vehicle and shall give an audible signal when necessary and shall exercise proper precaution upon observing any child or any obviously confused, incapacitated or intoxicated person.” Simply put, that means a driver must do everything in his or her power to avoid striking another person.

Similarly, pedestrians have a duty to take all possible steps to avoid a collision. Pedestrians must:

  • Comply with all traffic control signals and traffic regulations
  • Only cross the street in a designated crosswalk
  • Remain in a safe place when a vehicle is approaching and is close enough to create a risk
  • Use the right half of a crosswalk
  • Yield to vehicles if they are crossing the street anywhere but a crosswalk
  • Never cross a road diagonally, unless traffic signals indicate that they should do so
  • Never walk on a roadway when a sidewalk is available
  • Never walk on a highway, unless necessary
  • Walk on the left side of the road if forced to walk on a highway and yield right-of-way to all vehicles
  • Never walk on a sidewalk or roadway when incapacitated

South Carolina also provides pedestrians certain with rights. These include the right to:

  • Cross the road, or finish crossing the road, when approaching an intersection if traffic control signals are not in place
  • Be protected from all vehicles approaching an intersection
  • Be safe from vehicles when walking on a sidewalk
  • Cross the street at any point when using a raised cane, a walking stick that is white with a red tip, or a guide dog

When either pedestrians or drivers violate these laws, they can be held liable for their actions through a South Carolina personal injury claim.

Arrange a Free Consultation with a South Carolina Pedestrian Accident Lawyer

Pedestrian accidents can lead to catastrophic injuries. If you were hurt while walking in South Carolina, a skilled pedestrian accident attorney from Stewart Law Office can determine if you have a case and fight for the compensation you deserve. Contact us online to schedule a free case review today.

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