When Would I Need Uninsured Motorist or Underinsured Motorist Coverage In South Carolina? | Stewart Law Offices
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All drivers are legally required to have Uninsured Motorist (UM) Coverage in South Carolina.  This coverage applies in an accident where the responsible driver has no insurance, does not have coverage that meets state minimum liability limits, or has an insurance company that is unwilling/unable to pay.  It may also apply if you are injured in a hit-and-run accident.

Coverage limits in South Carolina are as follows: $25,000 per person for bodily injury up to $50,000 per accident and $25,000 per accident for property damage.

Uninsured Motorist (UM) coverage is always included as part of your liability insurance in South Carolina.

Your insurance company is required to present you with Underinsured Motorist (UIM) Coverage in a meaningful way when you sign up for your policy, but it is not mandatory to sign up. Since there is no clear answer as to what constitutes a meaningful offer, many court cases arise from accidents with underinsured motorists.

One benefit of UIM coverage is the ability to stack your coverage. This means that if you have more than one car insured under the same policy, you could have access to the combined coverage limits of all insured vehicles when one of those vehicles is involved in an accident with an uninsured/underinsured driver.

Insurance companies may not always represent your best interests. Even with both types of coverage, there are many occurrences when medical bills or damages are greater than your policy limits. Should you find yourself in a situation where you are not getting the coverage that you need after an accident where the at-fault driver is uninsured or underinsured, call Stewart Law Offices at (888)286-5600. We have offices in Rock Hill, Spartanburg, Columbia and by appointment in Beaufort*, and our attorneys represent victims throughout South Carolina.

Note: This information is for informational purposes and does not constitute legal advice. You can only receive legal advice by meeting with an attorney.